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Quantum Computing


Quantum sensors, which detect the most minute variations in magnetic or electrical fields, have enabled precision measurements in materials science and fundamental physics. But these sensors have only been capable of detecting a few specific frequencies of these fields, limiting their usefulness. Now, researchers at MIT have developed a method to enable such sensors to …

Quantum technology, which makes use of the surprising and often counterintuitive properties of the subatomic universe, is revolutionising the way information is gathered, stored, shared and analysed. The commercial and scientific potential of the quantum revolution is vast, but it is in national security that quantum technology is making the biggest waves. National governments are …

Last November, IBM Quantum announced Eagle, a 127-qubit quantum processor based on the transmon superconducting qubit architecture. The IBM Quantum team adapted advanced semiconductor signal delivery and packaging into a technology node to develop superconducting quantum processors. Last November, IBM Quantum announced Eagle, a 127-qubit quantum processor based on the transmon superconducting qubit architecture. The …

Quantum computing continues to advance at a rapid pace, but one challenge that holds the field back is mitigating the noise that plagues quantum machines. This leads to much higher error rates compared to classical computers.   This noise is often caused by imperfect control signals, interference from the environment, and unwanted interactions between qubits, …

IBM Quantum isn’t just building quantum computers — we’re developing an ecosystem around a technology which pushes the limit of human knowledge. In order to navigate forward in this field, we must rely on theoretical physicists to chart the course. You can think of IBM Quantum’s theorists as writing quantum computing’s rulebook. Theorists research the …

Like the transistors in a classical computer, superconducting qubits are the building blocks of a quantum computer. While engineers have been able to shrink transistors to nanometer scales, however, superconducting qubits are still measured in millimeters. This is one reason a practical quantum computing device couldn’t be miniaturized to the size of a smartphone, for instance. …

Villigen – Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute based in Villigen in the canton of Aargau are focused on the creation of topological quantum bits. These quantum bits, or qubits for short, form the basis of future quantum computers. More stable and therefore superior topological qubits would make quantum computers particularly efficient and compact. Niels …

Google’s Quantum AI team has had a productive 2021. Despite ongoing global challenges, we’ve made significant progress in our effort to build a fully error-corrected quantum computer, working towards our next hardware milestone of building an error-corrected quantum bit (qubit) prototype. At the same time, we have continued our commitment to realizing the potential of …

There is a huge global effort to engineer a computer capable of harnessing the power of quantum physics to carry out computations of unprecedented complexity. While formidable technological obstacles still stand in the way of creating such a quantum computer, today’s early prototypes are still capable of remarkable feats.     For example, the creation …

This article is part of the Global Technology Governance Summit The COVID-19 crisis is shining a Klieg light on the immense challenges of planning for the future amid extreme uncertainty. Now more than ever, leaders need tools to help them understand where they are headed beyond the near-term. Futures discussions can feel like a blizzard of …