Posts in tag

OpenVINO™


​What’s New: Intel has released the first set of open source AI reference kits specifically designed to make AI more accessible to organizations in on-prem, cloud and edge environments. First introduced at Intel Vision, the reference kits include AI model code, end-to-end machine learning pipeline instructions, libraries and Intel oneAPI components for cross-architecture performance. These kits enable data scientists …

Paris Baker, a 31-year-old mother of two, was an elite acrobatic gymnast who represented Great Britain and won silver at the European and World championships. At 26, Paris received a diagnosis of motor neurone disease (MND), which causes muscle weakness that gradually worsens over time and leads to disability. Of the many things that changed …

  ​What’s New: Since OpenVINO™ launched in 2018, Intel has enabled hundreds of thousands of developers to dramatically accelerate AI inferencing performance, starting at the edge and extending to the enterprise and the client. Today, ahead of MWC Barcelona 2022, the company launched a new version of the Intel® Distribution of OpenVINO Toolkit. New features are built upon …

What’s New: Intel, EXOR International, TIM and JMA Wireless teamed together to build an end-to-end smart factory in Verona, Italy, as an example of the benefits of Industry 4.0 digitalization to manufacturers of all sizes. Based on a breadth of Intel products, including Intel Atom® processors, Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors, Intel® FPGAs, Intel® Edge Controls for Industrial software and …

What’s New: Samsung Medison and Intel are collaborating on new smart workflow solutions to improve obstetric measurements that contribute to maternal and fetal safety and can help save lives. Using an Intel® Core™ i3 processor, the Intel® Distribution of OpenVINO™ toolkit and OpenCV library, Samsung Medison’s BiometryAssist™ automates and simplifies fetal measurements, while LaborAssist™ automatically estimates …

As a student pursuing a doctorate in systems design engineering at the University of Waterloo, Alexander Wong didn’t have enough money for the hardware he needed to run his experiments in computer vision. So he invented a technique to make neural network models smaller and faster. “He was giving a presentation, and somebody said, ‘Hey, …