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Research


AS ALGORITHMS ANALYZE MAMMOGRAMS AND SMARTPHONES CAPTURE LIVED EXPERIENCES, RESEARCHERS ARE DEBATING THE USE OF AI IN PUBLIC HEALTH. John Quackenbush was frustrated with Google. It was January 2020, and a team led by researchers from Google Health had just published a study in Nature about an artificial intelligence (AI) system they had developed to analyze mammograms for …

Scholars see deep learning’s pitfalls and limitations, the computer industry just sees a huge opportunity in matrix multiplications. The era of deep learning began in 2006, when Geoffrey Hinton, a professor at the University of Toronto, who is one of the founders of that particular approach to artificial intelligence, theorized that greatly improved results could be achieved …

“Artificial intelligence is transforming all sectors of the economy, but there’s no reason to fear that robots will replace all human employees. In fact, companies that automate their operations mainly to cut their workforces will see only short-term productivity gains, say the authors. Their research, involving 1,500 firms in a range of industries, shows that …

Pain. We will all experience it at some point, and some of us suffer from it chronically. Still, measuring and treating pain is one of the most difficult and complex healthcare issues. Together with Boston Scientific, a leading medical device technology company, we have developed a new method to measure pain. Our team of neuroscientists, …

Actions have consequences. And typically, when something happens, the order of the causes of the event really does matter. But understanding exactly how each action affects the final result is not always easy. Our latest work, “Order-Dependent Event Models for Agent Interactions,” presented at the International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence Organization (IJCAI), can help. …

Researchers, healthcare providers, and many others around the world are still grappling with COVID-19. Even a year into the pandemic, it remains challenging for doctors to predict how a patient’s condition may change over the course of the disease. Will the patient improve in the next few days or worsen to the point where more …

Imagine typing on a computer without a keyboard, playing a video game without a controller or driving a car without a wheel. That’s one of the goals of a new device developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, that can recognize hand gestures based on electrical signals detected in the forearm. The system, …

You don’t need a sledgehammer to crack a nut. Jonathan Frankle is researching artificial intelligence — not noshing pistachios — but the same philosophy applies to his “lottery ticket hypothesis.” It posits that, hidden within massive neural networks, leaner subnetworks can complete the same task more efficiently. The trick is finding those “lucky” subnetworks, dubbed …

One of the hottest topics in robotics is the field of soft robots, which utilizes squishy and flexible materials rather than traditional rigid materials. But soft robots have been limited due to their lack of good sensing. A good robotic gripper needs to feel what it is touching (tactile sensing), and it needs to sense …

Now that humans have programmed computers to learn, we want to know exactly what they’ve learned and how they make decisions after their learning process is complete. The answers to such questions could shed light on our own decision-making processes. Kate Saenko, an associate professor of computer science at Boston University, asked humans to look …